Emerald Ash Borer

Emerald ash borer (EAB) is an exotic beetle from Asia that feeds on ash tree foliage, usually in small, irregularly-shaped patches along the margins of leaves. Adult beetles are generally bright green and small enough to fit on a penny. EAB was discovered in July 2002 feeding on ash trees in southeastern Michigan and is now responsible for the destruction of millions of ash trees across 30 U.S. states, as well as in parts of Canada.

It is difficult to detect emerald ash borer in newly infested trees. When a tree has been infested for at least one year, the evidence starts to mount up. D-shaped exit holes left by emerging adults will be present on the branches and the trunk. Wavy trail lines in the cambium where bark has fallen away and dying branches in the upper and outer portions of the crown are also hallmarks of EAB hard at work.

Want to Know More?

Hungry Pests, a website maintained by the United States Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, is driven by the Leave Hungry Pests Behind initiative to raise public awareness about the threat of invasive pests. It provides an overview of the EAB, a handy quick facts section and resources for reporting the EAB in your state.

The Emerald Ash Borer Information Network is a collaborative effort of the USDA Forest Service and Michigan State University to provide comprehensive, accurate and timely information on the emerald ash borer, including how to move firewood, wood use options and options for when your ash trees have become infested.

Be A Smart Ash is a website with information about the EAB specific to the Denver, Colorado area. Don’t forget to check out their music video, “EAB (Get Ready)” to learn more about the EAB in an entertaining way!

There are a variety of treatment options for controlling the EAB, but unfortunately, none are a cure.

If you suspect you have trees affected by EAB, or any other pests, contact a professional arborist in your area to examine your trees and recommend potential treatment plans.


Image Credit:
Emerald ash borer: David Cappaert, Michigan State University
Catalogued on www.bugwood.org.

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