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EAB detected in new areas of Minnesota, Wisconsin and Tennessee

The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is adding Winona County, Minnesota, Claiborne County, Tennessee, and La Crosse County, Wisconsin to the list of quarantine areas for emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis. EAB, an invasive wood boring beetle, is native to China and eastern Asia. Since its first U.S. detection in Michigan, EAB has been responsible for the death and decline of tens of millions of U.S. ash trees. The interstate movement of firewood from quarantine areas is an especially high-risk pathway for spreading EAB. APHIS works with State cooperators and foresters to raise public awareness about this pest and the potential threats associated with long distance movement of firewood.

The Federal Orders outline specific conditions for the interstate movement of EAB-regulated articles from the quarantined areas in order to prevent the spread of EAB to other states. Specifically, the interstate movement of EAB-host wood and wood products from the quarantined areas is regulated, including firewood of all hardwood species, nursery stock, green lumber, waste, compost, and chips of ash species. EAB is present in some portions of the United States. Due to the continuing spread of EAB, APHIS has established quarantine areas, which are designated in the Federal regulations located at 7 CFR 301.53-3 and the Federal Orders located at the following APHIS website.


Entire State of Indiana under quarantine for pine shoot beetle

The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) added the entire State of Indiana to the list of quarantined areas for pine shoot beetle (PSB), Tomicus piniperda. PSB is an introduced pest of pines. It was first discovered in the United States at a Christmas tree farm near Cleveland, Ohio, in 1992. PSB can cause severe decline in the health of the trees, and in some cases, kill the trees when high populations exist.

Prior to this action, APHIS established quarantine areas in 68 Indiana counties, and the State of Indiana established and enforced an equivalent State-level quarantine. However, in June 2011, Indiana elected to rescind its PSB quarantine. For this reason, APHIS is establishing the entire State of Indiana as a quarantine area in order to prevent the spread of PSB to other states.

These actions are necessary to restrict the movement of PSB-host material. The Federal Order describes the expanded quarantine area, along with the associated reference to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 7 CFR §301.50, which lists the provisions for the movement of PSB-host material.


Educational Videos – Identifying Tree Problems

These educational sessions were shot at TCI EXPO 2010 in Pittsburgh PA.  View these videos to learn more about common problems that may affect your trees.  To find a Tree Care Company in your area for more information or to request a quote, click here.

Update on New Invasive Insects

In this TCI EXPO 2010 education session clip, Dr. Michael Raupp provides an update on invasive insects. New invasive insects including emerald ash borer, Asian longhorned beetle, winter moth, granulate ambrosia beetle, viburnum leaf beetle, and Sirex wood wasp pose serious new threats to trees and shrubs in cities, suburbs, and forests. (1:07:11)

Accurate Diagnosis is Fundamental to Maintaining Attractive, Healthy Trees

In this TCI EXPO 2010 education session clip, Dr. Sharon Douglass explains why accurate diagnosis of diseases is fundamental to maintaining attractive, healthy trees. Ornamental and shade trees are subject to a wide variety of problems that threaten their health. These problems can affect the aesthetics of the tree or have serious consequences that result in safety hazards and tree death. Douglass touches upon learning to identify common diseases by their symptoms and signs, identifying sources of potential inoculum, evaluating environmental and site conditions - above and below the ground, understanding conditions that contribute to the spread of pathogens and managing diseases using environmentally responsible strategies. (1:18:51)

Treatment Without a Correct Diagnosis is Malpractice!

In this TCI EXPO 2010 education session clip, Joe Boggs explains why treatment without a correct diagnosis is malpractice! Tree problem diagnostics is both an art and a science that involves a process. This process includes asking the questions that help lead arborists to the best possible diagnostic and management perspectives. Through case studies, this talk emphasizes the importance of the diagnostic process and realizing the strengths and limitations involved in correctly asking and answering key diagnostic questions. (34:00)

Man's Best Friend Protects American Agriculture

Thunder the beagle explains his job sniffing out the invasive Asian Longhorned Beetle.

Read the full article


Mountain Pine Beetle Destruction in Denver & Colorado Front Range

TCIA member company Swingle Lawn, Tree and Landscape Care warns of mountain pine beetle destruction in Denver and Colorado’s Front Range.

Since 1996, mountain pine beetles have devastated 3.2 million acres of Colorado forest. Now, Tom Tolkacz, CEO of Colorado's largest tree care company, says the pests are infiltrating the Front Range's urban areas. "Mountain pine beetle infestations usually attack one species of pine, clear the forest, and run their course," said Tolkacz. "Not this time. The pine beetle palette has changed from forested lodgepole to landscaped scotch and ponderosa pines, and in an alarmingly short period of time."

The 2010 Colorado State Forest Service Annual Report indicates the mountain pine beetle infestation jumped from 22,000 to 229,000 acres along the Colorado Front Range in one year. This tenfold increase is heaviest in Larimer, Boulder, Clear Creek and Gilpin Counties. Last summer, beetles were found infesting many areas of the Denver metropolitan area from Arvada and Brighton on the north to Parker and Castle Rock in the south.

Proactive and preventive applications are essential for saving trees. In Northern Colorado plains communities, between 10 to 30 percent of trees previously attacked by mountain pine beetle died this spring. Preventive applications are essential to protect high value trees.



Entire Commonwealth of Pennsylvania added to the Emerald Ash Borer quarantined area

Effective May 16, 2011, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is adding the entire Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to the list of quarantine areas for the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis. Prior to this action, APHIS established quarantine areas in 43 Pennsylvania counties and the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture established and enforced an equivalent State-level quarantine. However, on April 15, 2011, Pennsylvania rescinded its EAB quarantine. For this reason, APHIS is establishing the entire Commonwealth of Pennsylvania as a quarantine area in order to prevent the spread of EAB to other states.

EAB is an invasive wood boring beetle that is native to China and eastern Asia. It was first detected in the United States in southeastern Michigan. Since then, EAB has been responsible for the death and decline of tens of millions of ash trees in the United States.  The interstate movement of firewood from quarantined areas is an especially high-risk pathway for spreading EAB. APHIS is working with State cooperators and foresters to raise awareness amongst the public concerning this pest and of the potential threats associated with long distance movement of firewood.

The interstate movement of EAB-host wood and wood products from the State is regulated, including firewood of all hardwood species, nursery stock, green lumber, waste, compost, and chips of ash species.

EAB is present in some portions of the United States. Currently, some counties in Wisconsin are established EAB-quarantine areas, together with the entire States of Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. In addition, portions of Michigan, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Virginia, New York, Minnesota, Tennessee, and Missouri are considered EAB quarantine areas.



 

The Lifecycle of the Emerald Ash Borer

This CGI video, created by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture, shows the lifecycle of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB).

Produced by MDA through a unique collaboration with faculty and students of Art Institutes International (Aii) and McNally Smith College of Music, this video was made with technical assistance from staff from the Minnesota Department of Agriculture, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, and University of Minnesota Extension. Production of this video was made possible with funding from the United States Department of Agriculture.

For more information on EAB, visit http://www.mda.state.mn.us/en/plants/pestmanagement/eab.aspx .





Emerald Ash Borer Management Statement

Urban ash conservation can be less costly than removal, especially when the significant environmental and economic benefits of established trees are considered (www.treebenefits.com, http://extension.entm.purdue.edu/treecomputer/). Furthermore, ash conservation can circumvent the substantial environmental impacts caused by wholesale deforestation of the urban landscape, as well as the documented public safety risks associated with standing dead ash trees and their removal.

Read/Download the full statement (PDF)




Thousand Cankers Disease Discovered in East Tennessee

Just one week after the first signs of Emerald Ash Borer beetle in Tennessee were found, the Tennessee Department of Agriculture (TDA) confirmed a state forester’s discovery of Thousand Cankers Disease (TCD) in the same area – Knox County in East Tennessee. Thousand Cankers Disease is a fungus that affects walnut trees and is potentially devastating to the walnut lumber industry and threatens urban landscapes. TDA estimates there are 26 million black walnut trees on Tennessee public and private timberland potentially valued as high as $1.47 billion. An approximately 1.38 million walnut trees in urban areas throughout Tennessee are threatened as well.

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Pests in Southern California

The Department operates Entomology and Plant Pathology Laboratories, which seek to protect consumers by identifying exotic insects (and other invertebrates), invasive weeds and plant pathogens entering Los Angeles County through truck, ship, airfreight, and parcel delivery operations. The laboratories provide rapid and accurate identifications to support the Pest Detection and Pest Exclusion programs and offer identification and information services for Los Angeles County residents, schools, governmental agencies, growers, nursery and pest control operators. Overall, the laboratories process over 8,000 pest specimens submitted annually.

Interested in submitting samples for identification or analysis? Click here



Recognize Forest Pests

The Exotic Forest Insect Guidebook, originally published in 2004 by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, includes descriptions of insects, the damage they cause, the host trees they attack, and their geographic distribution. Most of the species identified in this guide could pose a serious risk to northern forests if introduced. Some have already been established in North America.

Download the Exotic Forest Insect Guidebook (PDF)


EAB continues to spread

On October 8, the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) confirmed the identification of EAB in Fayette and Morgan Counties in West Virginia. Recently, the presence of EAB was also confirmed in Roane County. Previously, APHIS had established quarantine areas only Fayette and Morgan Counties due to the establishment and enforcement of equivalent State quarantines. West Virginia has now rescinded their EAB quarantines. For this reason, APHIS is establishing quarantine for the entire State of West Virginia in order to prevent the spread of EAB to other states.

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Play it Safe: Reduce Your Child's Risk of Pesticide Poisoning

You turn your head and your toddler is inserting a sandwich half into the DVD player. Mostly, we're lucky; our momentary slipups as parents aren’t too harmful. However, some close calls can be scary—like catching your three-year-old holding a can of bug spray.

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Insecticide Options for Protecting Ash Trees from Emerald Ash Borer

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Emerald Ash Borer has now been found in Western NY

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Homeowners Notice: Treatment of trees in Massachusetts for Asian Longhorned Beetle is available

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Quarantine Established for European Gypsy Moth

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Quarantine Area Expanded for ALB in Worcester


The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is expanding the Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) quarantine area to include additional portions of Worcester County, Massachusetts.

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Mechanical Barriers


Is There a Place for them in 21st Pest Control?

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EAB Found in Two Counties in Wisconsin


Officials with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources announced Aug. 4 the first confirmed occurrence of emerald ash borer (EAB) in Wisconsin. The discovery was made by forest health specialists investigating a citizen report of dying ash trees in a private woodlot in Ozaukee County, near the Village of Newburg.

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Ticks Suck


Spring and Summer are tick season, and with increasing tick encounters comes risk for diseases like Lyme disease, babesiosis, and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. Learn to routinely take just a few simple steps that can keep you safe, and maybe increase business, too.

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Is 2,4-D Safe for my Landscape?


On Friday, May 16, 2008, Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PEMA) released its final reevaluation of 2,4-D, the leading pesticide in use in Canada. It was one of the most comprehensive science reviews in Canadian history, carried out exclusively by Health Canada scientists.

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Bugs in the Trees? Be a First Detector!

In an effort to control the worst invasive insects in North America, Tree Care Tips and the Tree Care Industry Association have launched a first-detector training series to help treeworkers and homeowners identify these pests. Funded by a grant from the USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Area, this initiative includes training materials and bug recognition information sheets.

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Emerald Ash Borer

Emerald Ash Borer found in Pennsylvania

More about the Emerald Ash Borer...


What is Attacking our Beech Trees?

Beech Bark Disease has been felling beech trees in Europe and the U.S. for over 150 years. What causes this damaging disease? Read a report by the U.S. Department of Agriculture...


How Do I Rid My Tree of Insects?

Just as in human medicine, proper treatment begins with diagnosis. A professional arborist, nursery operator, or state/county extension agent can help you determine what the bug, or insect, is. Some bugs are beneficial! Read about insects and trees...


Help Your Trees Resist Pests

On your property, insects and microorganisms abound. This is a natural and beneficial state, since insects and microorganisms are key components in nutrient recycling, decomposition, plant succession, natural pest control, and wildlife habitat. But outbreaks of harmful organisms do happen. Read what's crawling around on your trees...


Treating Tree Diseases

Keeping trees, shrubs and other woody plants healthy is the job of professional arborists. Deciding when to use fungicides and other plant health improvement techniques should be left to professionals. Read this important information...


Plant Health Care and Trees

Do you have concern about whether or not your trees and shrubs are healthy? How would you know if they needed a doctor? Plant Health Care, or PHC is a special field of arboriculture. A PHC technician can evaluate your landscape and recommend programs for diseases, pests, and other concerns. Read more about PHC...


U.S. Department of Agriculture:
More about tree diseases

Visit this website for brochures on tree diseases, organized by regions. http://na.fs.fed.us/pubs/fidlwest.shtm